Category Archives: Labor & Employment

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Sixth Circuit Refuses To Stop Collective Action Notice To Employees with Individual Arbitration Agreements

A Sixth Circuit opinion filed this week reaffirms what experienced Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) attorneys have known for some time:  when it comes to employer arbitration programs, they are not always the panacea that employers (and their lawyers) believe them to be. In Taylor v. Pilot Corp. et al., Case No. 16-5326, a plaintiff-employee … Continue Reading

The DOJ’s Evolving View of the Interplay Between the Federal Arbitration Act and the National Labor Relations Act

Employers in the gaming and hospitality arena are eagerly awaiting the results of the upcoming changes to the legal landscape that are expected to emerge from a business-oriented administration. These employers have long tried to reduce the costs and length of litigation, particularly in the context of wage and hour claims, by requiring employees to … Continue Reading

House of Representatives Passes Overtime Bill to Give Workers Time Off Instead of Time-And-A-Half Pay

On May 2, 2017, the United States House of Representatives (the House) passed the Working Families Flexibility Act (the Act), which would give workers the option of receiving paid time off (PTO) instead of time-and-a-half pay currently mandated by the Fair Labor Standards Act (the FLSA). The Act passed 227-197, largely along party lines, with … Continue Reading

DOL Announces Reversal of Employee/Independent Contractor Classification & Joint Employer Guidance

On June 7, 2017, the United States Department of Labor (DOL) reversed its previous guidance issued during the administration of President Barack Obama that broadened the circumstances in which employers could be held liable for misclassification of employees as independent contractors, and as a joint employer with a separate business.  New Secretary of Labor Alex … Continue Reading

OSHA Rescinds Fairfax Memo – OSHA No Longer Required to Permit Union Reps to Represent Non-Union Employees in Walkaround Inspections

On April 25, 2017, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rescinded a Feb. 21, 2013 letter from former Deputy Assistant Secretary Richard E. Fairfax to Mr. Steve Sallman (Fairfax Memo) that permitted workers at a worksite without a collective bargaining agreement to designate a person affiliated with a union or community organization to act … Continue Reading

The Senate Narrows Employers’ Obligation to Accurately Record Work-Related Injury and Illness Records

On March 22, 2017, the Senate passed H.J. Resolution 83, a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution (Resolution) that cuts the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) ability to cite an employer for failing to accurately record work-related injuries and illnesses from five years to six months.1 The resolution blocks and eliminates OSHA’s “Volks” final rule, … Continue Reading

Philadelphia Becomes the First City to Prohibit Employers from Asking Applicants About Salary History

Employers who just last year revised their application forms to eliminate initial questions about past arrests and convictions, now have to revise them again to remove questions regarding current and past salary. On Jan. 23, 2017, Philadelphia’s mayor signed a wage equity ordinance (the Ordinance) which prohibits, among other things, employers from asking job applicants … Continue Reading

OMB Fall Unified Regulatory Agenda- Improvement of the Employment Creation Immigrant Regulations (EB-5)

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released the Fall Unified Agenda, updating the Improvement of the Employment Creation Immigrant Regulations.  DHS has now moved the stage of rulemaking from “long-term actions” to “proposed rule stage.”  This new release also changes the date of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) from “to be determined” to January … Continue Reading

Court Stays DOL Overtime Rule, Holds Increased Salary Test Impermissibly ‘Supplants’ Duties Tests

The proposed overtime rules will not go into effect on Dec. 1. In a closely-watched case brought by 21 states (and joined by numerous business organizations) challenging the Department of Labor’s (DOL) rule amendment which would have roughly doubled the minimum salary threshold for many employees to be considered exempt from federal overtime requirements (set … Continue Reading
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